What is Alzheimer's disease in simple terms?

What is Alzheimer's disease in simple terms?

What's the Difference Between Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia?

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answers (4)

Answer 1
June, 2021

The brain turns on the program to forget the loss. Chronic conflict of separation.

The disease itself is a biologically grounded process, from the point of view of modern psychosomatics. And it arises as a reaction of our body to adaptation to a stressful situation and emotional conflict.

Getting sick is not so easy, the life situation should be: dramatic, isolated, unexpected, unsolvable and long in time. For example, sore throat is a lump conflict, I cannot swallow the lump (prey) that I already have in my mouth. A person is delayed in payment, whose salary was suddenly delayed and every day "they are fed breakfast", at this moment the amygdala is growing. At the moment when he receives a salary, his conflict is resolved, angina begins

Therefore, any organ has a reason to "hurt" and it is associated with a conflict experience. If you are interested in the cause of a specific disease, you can write in private messages.

Answer 2
June, 2021

In Alzheimer's disease, a large number of small nodules consisting of amyloid protein are formed in the cortex and subcortex of the brain (this distinguishes Alheimer's disease from all other dementias). These nodules break down the connections between neurons. This process is irreversible and cannot be stopped. More and more nodules form - more and more neurons lose connection with each other.

Loss of connections between neurons leads first to forgetfulness, absent-mindedness. At first, memory suffers for current events, then it spreads further and further into the past. There is a loss of self-service skills. The patient becomes unkempt. Stops navigating in the current date, then cannot name the current day of the week. Later he cannot name the current month, then the year, the season. But he remembers his date of birth perfectly, although he no longer knows his age. Speech is broken: it becomes poorer, more primitive. The patient learns something new with great difficulty.

Long months and years pass. The patient has disturbed sleep, hallucinations, fragmentary delusional ideas appear. The memory is already so impaired that it does not recognize neighbors, distant acquaintances. Can't navigate the apartment, can't remember where the toilet and kitchen are. Then the disorganization of neurons reaches the point that the function of the pelvic organs is disrupted. The person cannot control urination and bowel movements. Such people wear diapers. Soon he does not recognize his closest relatives.

Then his gait is disturbed. Becomes shuffling, slow. Then the person stops walking altogether - only lies in bed. Speech disappears: the person just hums, screams, moans, utters syllables.

Result: the person cannot walk, cannot talk, does not recognize anyone, cannot eat on his own, urinates in diapers. Only lies in bed like a vegetable. Death often occurs from congestive pneumonia.

Mentally, a person turns into a baby (just like in the movie "The Curious Story of Benjamin Button").

Answer 3
June, 2021

Alzheimer's disease is a gradual decline of mental abilities, the mechanism of which is not fully understood, and an effective antidote for which has not yet been discovered. Hera in her answer vividly illustrated some of the symptoms and evolution of this disease. Put yourself in the shoes of an 86-year-old grandmother: this deadly disease is as terrible from the inside as it is from the outside. She falls a terrible burden on the shoulders of the patient himself, and on those around him, the closest ones. For the latter, it becomes a strict test of humanity. Alas, few can withstand it.

A person who coped with a bunch of things perfectly well, who was a model for you and his friends in many ways, now suddenly loses his memory, and with it all other mental abilities, degenerates before your eyes.

On the other hand, he (s), like a child, asks for your affection, kindness, patience, tact.

The disease is getting younger and mows people right and left. In the United States, nationwide campaigns are being carried out to draw the attention of society and the government to this disease and its victims, to raise funds to fund relevant research and development. We have a group site on VK.

I wrote this so that you understand that Alzheimer's is an exposed nerve, not a reason to scoff.

Answer 4
June, 2021

A person does not remember what was recently, but at the same time, as a rule, he remembers bright moments from life, as if it were yesterday (what was 20-40 years ago). In general, first of all, memory suffers, and from here a kind of disorientation follows. + Auditory / visual hallucinations may occur. For example, a person can hear / see people. Sometimes paranoid phenomena appear (they want to rob me, they follow me). Brain cells suffer, hence the suffering of the person himself and the people close to him ... My great-grandmother had this disease at the age of 86, she forgot how I look sometimes. Once, in the middle of the night, she got up and went, consider what her mother gave birth to in the entrance, knocked on the concierge's door with a demand to call the police, because in her opinion, someone had settled in her house and they wanted to kill her (she settled I slept in the next room). It was scary sometimes, after this incident I removed all piercing cutting objects away. Once, she went to the mirror with the words "Who is this?", I told her: "It's you," she replied - "How is it? What is so old? How old do you think I am", "Granny, you are 86", " No! What are you talking about! I'm 60 ". Somehow, in my opinion, the case I described fully describes the essence of the disease and its manifestations.

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