What does the stoop of a person say, from the point of view of psychosomatics?

What does the stoop of a person say, from the point of view of psychosomatics?

The Avalanches - 'Frontier Psychiatrist'

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answers (4)

Answer 1
January, 2021

This means that a person is now going through a difficult period in life and some kind of burden of problems presses on him, which he is currently unable to cope with. Sad situation.

Answer 2
January, 2021

From the point of view of psychosomatics, stoop is a load of problems. They "press" on the shoulders and back, making it difficult to breathe deeply.

In addition, it may mean that the person is trying to "hide", become smaller and more invisible. This can be clearly seen in companies where it is unpleasant for a person to be.

Answer 3
January, 2021

Many people take psychosomatics too literally. This is partly due to the books of Louise Hay, who recovered herself from cancer and wrote a book about it. In this book, she provides a whole table with psychological deciphering of bodily symptoms and affirmations that should work in such cases.
However, this is not statistically confirmed.
Interpretation of specific diseases depends largely on the paradigm in which this or that psychologist, psychotherapist works. And most importantly, it depends on the subjective meaning that the sick person himself puts into his illness. It is necessary to remember the difference in human experience and mentality. For one person, stoop will be associated with a load of problems, and for another with something else. In addition, sometimes "a banana is just a banana", that is, the disease may not be psychosomatic at all, but genetic, infectious, and so on.
Therefore, each case must be considered individually and directly with a person who wants to work through their own bodily problem.

Answer 4
January, 2021

Psychosomatics is a scientific direction in medicine and psychology that studies the relationship or influence of psychological factors on somatic (bodily) problems.

In practice, psychosomatics is often called physical pain or discomfort that cannot be explained by bodily illness. An example is somatoform pain.

In order for this or that phenomenon to become a part of psychosomatics, one must first make sure that its cause is not another disease and the role of psychological factors in its development is quite high.

Slouching and other problems with posture have nothing to do with psychosomatics.

All interpretations from the "throat hurts because you are afraid to say something" series are myths. These ideas take their origin from books by Louise Hay, Liz Burbo, Sinelnikov, etc. They do not relate to psychology, medicine and science in general and are not supported by any facts.

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