What does antidepressant drugs look like from the inside?

What does antidepressant drugs look like from the inside?

Antidepressants Make it Harder to Empathize, Harder to Climax, and Harder to Cry. | Julie Holland

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answers (4)

Answer 1
June, 2021

More:

https://thequestion.ru/questions/7824/kak-deistvuyut-antidepressanty

Answer 2
June, 2021

Pretty interesting if you figure it out. You can divide the mechanisms of action of antidepressants into 3 groups:
1) Means that inhibit the reuptake of monoamines (serotonin, dopamine)
The essence of this mechanism is that after the release of monoamines from the presynaptic terminal, they act on specific receptors, which in in turn leads to certain changes in the target cell, in case of depression due to an insufficient amount of these same monoamines and the very effect of their action becomes weak, therefore, if monoamines do not undergo reverse neuronal uptake (in other words, they are captured by the very presynaptic endings where they come from and stand out), then they will act on the target cells longer, which in turn will lead to an increase in their effect.
2) Inhibitors of monoamine oxidase (MAO)
It's easier here: MAO inactivates monoamines, the very ones, the lack of which leads to depression, therefore, if the inactivator is inactivated, then monoamines will be more => stronger effect on target cells
3) "Atypical" antidepressants
There can be many different mechanisms here, for example, Mirtazapine blocks Alpha-2 adrenergic receptors, which are acted upon by norepinephrine, isolated from the presynaptic terminal, and, as it were, says "I am already here, acting on the cell; leads to an increase in the release of noradenaline (the same mechanism for serotonin) and, in fact, an increase in their effect.
Something like that.

Answer 3
June, 2021

At the heart of mental activity is a completely material process: the transmission of a nerve impulse through a nerve cell. Medicines affect the transfer of information from one cell to another. They act on various mediators and determine the transfer of information from one cell to another. Among these mediators: serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine. Previously, there was a narrow set - only five antidepressants. Now there are several dozen of them. Thanks to the variety of actions on mediator processes, we can achieve good results.

Answer 4
June, 2021

Most of them work directly through the system of neurotransmitters, which are responsible for transmitting neural signals through contacts - synapses. A chemical synapse is easiest to imagine as a full-face knee joint: two "bones" and a gap between them. A neurotransmitter is released into this gap from one neuron, which reaches its goal - receptors on the other side, and potentiates or inhibits the electrical activity of the second neuron. It depends on the type of neurotransmitter and the type of receptor. The effect is not very selective and involves a lot of neurons in a wide variety of areas of the brain, although new antidepressants show high selectivity for functional areas of the brain and types of receptors / neurotransmitters, thus minimizing side effects. The oldest group is tricyclic antidepressants, which increase the concentration of monoamines - neurotransmitters such as serotonin and norepinephrine - in the synapse by blocking an enzyme that breaks down these neurotransmitters. Accordingly, the effect of their signals is amplified.

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