What and how soon will happen to the human body, which for a long time eats three eggs every day in the morning?

What and how soon will happen to the human body, which for a long time eats three eggs every day in the morning?

I Ate A Dozen Eggs A Day - Here Is What Happened To My Weight, Cholesterol, Testosterone and More!

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answers (2)

Answer 1
April, 2021

The results of studies on the effects of egg consumption on human health are ambiguous and contradictory, differ in populations, especially in the context of the possible risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases in patients with already established type 2 diabetes mellitus.
Research review:
1. Egg consumption, risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes: a meta-analysis. 2013.
14 studies, 320,778 participants were included in the meta-analysis.
Research shows that there is a positive dose-dependent relationship between egg consumption, cardiovascular risk and diabetes. Eating more than 4 eggs per week increases the risk of heart disease by 19% and increases the risk of diabetes by 68%, compared to those who ate less. For those who have already had diabetes, the risk of developing heart disease from eating eggs rises to 83%.
http://www.pcrm.org/health/medNews/eggs-harmful-to-health
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23643053
2. Egg consumption and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Stockholm, Sweden. Cambridge, UK. 2016.
Conclusions: Our results in a cohort of Swedish men do not support an association between egg consumption and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In meta-analyzes, frequent egg consumption was associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes in studies conducted in the United States. Egg consumption and diet in general may differ between populations and could potentially explain the discrepancy between the reported results. Given the conflicting data for the general population, the potential link between egg consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus requires further investigation.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26993632
https: / /www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4861752/
3. Egg consumption in relation to the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2013.
Evidence from this meta-analysis suggests that egg consumption is not associated with an increased risk of overall cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, stroke, or mortality. However, compared to those who never consume eggs, those who eat 1 egg per day or more are 42% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. Among those with type 2 diabetes, those who consume 1 or more eggs per day are 69% more likely to have heart disease.
Conclusions: This meta-analysis shows that egg consumption is not associated with cardiovascular risk. vascular disease and CVD mortality in the general population. However, egg consumption is associated with an increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in the general population and an increase in cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ 23676423
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3683816/
4.Egg Consumption for Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality: A Physician Health Study.
Conclusions: Our data suggest that consumption of up to 6 eggs per week does not significantly affect the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality, and that Consuming 7 or more eggs per week is associated with a moderate increase in the risk of all-cause mortality among male doctors in the United States. However, among male doctors with diabetes, any egg consumption is associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality, suggesting an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih .gov / pmc / articles / PMC2386667 /
5. Egg Consumption and Heart Failure Risk in Physicians' Health Study.
Conclusions: Our data suggests that consumption of up to 6 eggs per week is not associated with the risk of heart failure, while consumption of 7 or more eggs per week is associated with an increased risk development of heart failure among American male doctors.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18195171
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/ PMC2706003 /
6. Egg consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a meta-analysis.
Conclusions: Consumption of up to 1 egg per day is not associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease or stroke. Subgroup analysis showed that consumption of up to one egg per day was associated with a significantly increased risk of coronary heart disease in patients with diabetes mellitus, as well as with a reduced risk of hemorrhagic stroke. The increased risk of coronary heart disease in diabetic patients and the reduced risk of hemorrhagic stroke associated with higher egg consumption in subgroup analyzes warrants further research.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ pubmed / 23295181
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3538567/
7. Egg consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis.
Conclusions: The meta-analysis shows no relationship between infrequent egg consumption and the risk of diabetes, but suggests a modest increased risk of diabetes mellitus with the consumption of 3 or more eggs per week, limited to US research.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26739035
8. Egg consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes in men and women.
Conclusions: Research evidence suggests that daily egg consumption is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in men and women. Daily consumption of 1 egg is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in men and women, regardless of traditional risk factors for type 2 diabetes.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19017774
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2628696/
9. Egg consumption and the risk of heart failure, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Karolinska Institute, Hundredkgolm, Sweden. 2015.
Conclusions: Daily egg consumption was not associated with the risk of myocardial infarction or any type of stroke in men and women, or in women with heart failure. Consuming 1 or more eggs per day was associated with an increased risk of heart failure in men.
In this study, daily egg consumption was not associated with the risk of myocardial infarction, ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke in men and women, or women with heart failure. However, the daily consumption of eggs was associated with a 30% increased risk of heart failure, and with the consumption of 2 or more eggs per day, the risk increased by 2 times. In men, eating less than 6 eggs per week was not associated with the risk of heart failure. However, in a subgroup analysis, higher egg consumption was associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease / cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients.
Our data on egg consumption and heart failure risk in men are consistent with the results previous studies. In the Physicians' Health Study, eating less than 6 eggs per week was not associated with the risk of heart failure. However, people who ate 1 egg per day had a 33% increased risk of heart failure, and those who consumed more than 2 eggs per day had a 56% higher risk compared to those who ate less than 1 egg per day. In the study groups of middle-aged American adults, each increase in egg consumption per serving per day was statistically significantly associated with a 23% increased risk of heart failure in both men and women. In the current study, egg consumption was not associated with heart failure in women. The reason for the disparate results for men and women in this study remains unclear.
Studies of egg consumption in relation to types of stroke are few. Results from the Nursing and Healthcare Professionals Study showed no dose-response relationship or statistically significant results in ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke, compared with the highest and lowest egg intakes. However, when analyzed as a continuous variable, each gain of 1 serving per day of egg consumption was associated with a statistically significant 44% reduction in the risk of hemorrhagic stroke, but was not associated with ischemic stroke. In the Swedish cohorts, we did not find a statistically significant association between egg consumption and any type of stroke, but spline analysis suggested a positive association between very high egg consumption and ischemic stroke in men.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih. gov / pubmed / 26399866
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/102/5/1007.long
10. Egg consumption, risk of coronary heart disease and stroke: a meta-analysis. 2016.
Conclusions: Based on the results of this meta-analysis, consumption of up to 1 egg per day may be associated with any type of risk reduction and12% increase in stroke, and daily egg consumption does not appear to be clearly associated with a decrease or increase in the risk of coronary heart disease.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2016.1152928?journalCode = uacn20
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27710205
11. Egg consumption and cardio-metabolic health in people with and without diabetes mellitus. Effects of a diet high in eggs on cardiovascular risk factors in people with type 2 diabetes mellitus: an RCT. University of Sydney, Australia. 2015.
Conclusions: Consuming eggs can be safe and used as part of a healthy diet in the general population, and for those at high risk for cardiovascular disease, with pre-established coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes.
There is a conflict of interest in the study; the authors received grants from the Australian Egg Corporation. Only the authors of the study, and no one else, participated in writing the article and analyzing the data. (NRF, IDC and TPM have received research grants for other clinical trials funded by Australian Egg Corporation Limited, Sanofi-Aventis, Novo Nordisk, Allergan, Roche products, Merck, Sharp & Dohm, and GlaxoSmithKline. IDC was an Executive Steering Committee member for the SCOUT trial, is on the Organizing Committee of EXSCEL trial, and has received payment for lectures from iNova Pharmaceuticals, Pfizer Australia, and Servier Laboratories (Australia). TPM acts as an advisory member to the Egg Nutrition Council, Nestle Nutrition and Novo Nordisk and has received payments for lectures from Novo Nordisk and Astra Zeneca. AS has received research and fellowship funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council and the University of Sydney, she has received honoraria by Eli Lilly Australia, the Pharmacy Guild of Australia, Novo Nordisk and the Dietitians Association of Australia for conference presentations, and holds shares in a company (Zuman International) th at sells her books about adult weight management. No one other than the authors listed on this manuscript had any role in the analysis of the data, or the writing of the manuscript).
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4586539 /
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25833969
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/101/4/705.long
12. Egg consumption improves lipoprotein profile and insulin sensitivity in people with metabolic syndrome: an RCT. 2013.
Findings: Daily Whole Egg Consumption on a Moderate Carbohydrate Restricted Diet Provides Improvement in Atherogenic Lipoprotein Profile and Insulin Resistance in People with Metabolic Syndrome.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed / 23021013
13. Egg Consumption and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: Japan, Center for Public Health. 2014.
In conclusion, higher intake of cholesterol and eggs is not associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in the Japanese population.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25230771
14. Egg consumption and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes in men. 2015.
In conclusion, the study did not show any negative effects of up to 1 egg per day on the risk of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged and older men from eastern Finland, but rather suggested an inverse relationship.
ajcn .nutrition.org
15. Egg bioactive components and inflammation. 2015.
Most studies show that egg consumption increases markers of inflammation in healthy adults, while egg consumption in conditions of overweight, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and T2DM has either anti-inflammatory or neutral effects. It is possible that this is due to differences in intestinal absorption of dietary cholesterol, which is known to be increased in healthy people. However, it is possible that other factors influence the feeding response to eggs, such as microbiome composition or genetic variation. In addition, it is important to recognize variables that potentially influence outcomes across studies, such as differences in the number of eggs consumed per day, dietary regimens / interventions used, or medications consumed.
http://ajcn.nutrition.org/ content / 101/5 / 1088.long
16. Egg consumption and cardiovascular disease according to diabetic status. 2016.
When comparing groups of people consuming less than 2 eggs per week and more than 4 eggs per week, there was no difference in the increased risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with diabetes mellitus or without diabetes, and in those with high cardiovascular vascular risk.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27448949
17. Egg consumption and the risk of diabetes. 2011.
Conclusions: Egg consumption is positively associated with diabetes risk among Chinese people, especially women.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20471806
18. Egg consumption and coronary artery calcification in asymptomatic men and women. 2015. Seoul, Korea.
Conclusions: Egg consumption was associated with an increased prevalence of subclinical coronary atherosclerosis, with a greater degree of coronary calcification in asymptomatic Korean adults. The association was especially noticeable among those with low vegetable intake and those with high BMI.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26062990
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Answer 2
April, 2021

Probably, the question is an echo of funny battles, when some quite authoritative doctors cry about "bad" cholesterol in the yolks, and no less authoritative others - about "good", which, they say, so overlaps the effects of "bad" that you need to eat eggs on the contrary, more.

This is a special case of how, in fact, we do not know anything particularly definite about the "harm" / "benefit" of a particular food and food additives: all information is regularly updated in polarity)

As far as I can judging by your general medical knowledge, three eggs a day, if you are not allergic to eggs, or some other very specific pathology, - neither for good nor for worse, quite normal food. Eat as long as you want.

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