Is there a scientific basis for dividing people into the humanities and techies? Do all people have a certain tendency, and can it be changed?

Is there a scientific basis for dividing people into the humanities and techies? Do all people have a certain tendency, and can it be changed?

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Answers (3)

Answer 1
October, 2020

People are not divided only into techies and humanities.

Who are geologists or botanists? Techies or humanities? And the doctors? An engineer at a plant and an astrophysicist are also of the same berry field?

Or, for example, a philologist and a director are they genuine humanities? And where to include artists, psychologists, lawyers? And archaeologists?

Rather, there are more inclinations. These are mathematicians, technicians, natural scientists, artists (in the broadest sense). And apparently more and more. Someone is inclined to theorize in the office (historian or mathematician), someone to travel and climb into unexplored corners (archaeologists, geological prospectors).

The same talented mathematician cannot do without a developed imagination. Historians have quite clear patterns, the formation of which real scientists are engaged in, and not just collecting a set of dates and surnames. The same historians have to work rather routinely and scrupulously on sources, and not only grind with language or write heaps of books and monographs. The same archaeologists need to have a baggage of applied knowledge from geology and biology, use physics and chemistry to date artifacts.

Artists need geometry, and musicians need mathematical thinking.

Historians, philologists, sociologists and even poets are full of their own "matana", they are often boring and reserved people. And many physicists, mathematicians, or chemists are often romantic eccentrics hovering in the clouds.

In short, there are no strictly humanists and strictly techies. A real professional, especially a scientist, should be able to think abstractly and have a developed imagination, but also use clear formulas and methodology, be a skeptic, use all research tools in his field.

Answer 2
October, 2020

I would say that these differences in people are connected primarily due to the different development of two types of thinking - abstract and figurative. If from childhood a person learned (or was taught) to think abstractly, then he is more powerful in mathematics, and if figuratively - in "lyrical" subjects. Moreover, people do not always understand what kind of thinking they bring up in a child.

And what about changing is a very difficult question, depending on two factors: a person's personal beliefs about this and his desire to develop his other type of thinking. But, I think, with proper training, the right approach and self-confidence, a person will be able to develop a different type of thinking, regardless of the opinions of others.

Answer 3
October, 2020

This is a very hotly debated issue at the moment. For a long time it was believed that success in mathematics requires a certain "talent", and, in particular, that men have a greater "inclination" for mathematics than women. Modern research, however, shows that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to catch and reveal this "talent", but it is very easy to find many suggestions, self-hypnosis and sincere delusions that make people ascribe these same talents to each other and to themselves (and more often - the absence of such). For example, if you give women and men classical math problems, then women, on average, solve them worse. If you give problems that inherently require mathematical thinking, but are "disguised" so that it is not easy to learn mathematics in them, then women solve them in the same way, or even better than men. Which proves once again that many people not so much "have no talent" for mathematics, but are afraid of the very word "mathematics", for various psychological reasons, and lose their self-control and faith in themselves every time they hear it.

On the other hand, there are researchers who believe that while relative talents for mathematics and language are more or less evenly spread, the "addiction" to mathematics or language, precisely from an emotional point of view, in terms of how much a person "likes "to do this or that, spread unevenly. And perhaps this is what leads to the fact that some people become "lyricists", and others - "physicists." Not because they have "talent", but because someone likes to play with words, and someone, say, numbers.

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