Is it true that people from birth have limitations in their minds? That is, a person simply physically cannot master mathematics? Or can anyone, with the proper effort?

Is it true that people from birth have limitations in their minds? That is, a person simply physically cannot master mathematics? Or can anyone, with the proper effort?

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answers (2)

Answer 1
September, 2021

I am not familiar with the relevant research, but the answer of the previous speaker confused me, so I will insert my five cents.
Applied specifically to mathematics: depending on what you mean by mastering. Experience shows that "the blond plays well, and the brunette plays badly, and no lectures will change this balance of forces." I mean that the mathematical abilities themselves, and, consequently, the ability to "master" science do not grow from the amount of effort, at least from a certain moment. For example, if I got now (or in general at any age) a geometry problem that does not imply the use of any knowledge, it would take me as long as 16 years. The upper limit of mathematical skills is reached rather quickly and not particularly breaks through, and also what interests us here first of all can vary greatly from person to person. Nevertheless, it seems to me that almost everyone has enough potential to understanding the school curriculum in the time allotted for this. Whether this can be considered mastering is a semantic question.

Speaking about abilities, I meant, first of all, the ability to solve problems, because the awareness of things, especially basic ones, is only a matter of time, and when we say that a person cannot understand something, we must mean that mastering this something will take him an inadequately long period of time. Then this concept of "big" requires clarification, and it is also necessary to somehow figure out how much it will take for this or that person to understand certain things. This path seems to me too thorny, although it should give a more appropriate answer.

That is, in short, the answer sounds very deep: some people are smarter than others, and absolutely nothing can be done about it. To understand, for example, matan, some people will take so much time and effort that it is appropriate to say that they are not given to learn it. It is impossible to achieve noticeable progress in solving problems for which all the necessary knowledge is already available, starting from a certain moment. Lapalissiada, but that is the question.

And yes, as far as I know, at a particularly early age, a person can still increase his cognitive abilities, so the limitation is not entirely from birth.

Well, school mathematics is first of all logic, and not some kind of sequence.

Answer 2
September, 2021

A healthy person does not have any limitations of the mind that will distinguish him from other people inherently. Of course, there will be some preferences, variations: some have better visual memory, some have auditory, tactile and others. But the presence of an inclination in one area does not prejudice the ability to learn another: if it is difficult for you to remember historical dates, a poem or, as in the above example, mathematical formulas and ways to solve them. Even if something is given hard, it is difficult to remember - you can still achieve success through repeated repetitions and memorization. Speaking about mathematics, we can say that for the most part any examples are a sequence of actions, from simple to simplified. Simple, for example, is addition or subtraction and so on. 3 + 3 + 3 = 9. A simple sequence of actions, where the second is added to the first number, and the third is added to the resulting one. As for the simplified ones, these are roots, integrals, logarithms. There will be a little one: a sequence of actions, which, in order not to paint for a long time and find out "which number needs to be multiplied by itself, to end up with 9", you can simply write "root of 9". I don't think that in order to know this, you need any special skills, or that some innate limitations prevent a healthy person from assimilating this. I don't know anything about mathematical analysis, if the question was about it, but if it's about a simple school curriculum, it's all just a sequence of actions of different examples / equations. And formulas are needed to shorten this sequence.

Demosthenes can serve as an example of what depends only on desire and perseverance. Having congenital ailments in the form of lisping, stuttering, quiet speech, shaking and swaying during conversations, and others, he dreamed of becoming an orator. He began to put stones in his mouth and go out to sea in order to pronounce the words loudly and clearly. He did not escape from stuttering and lisping, but he memorized all his speeches so that no one would guess about these ailments. And from shaking and twitching - he placed sharp objects around himself and made a speech, practicing so to restrain himself. And he became an orator. So there are no physical limitations of the mind, it's only a matter of desire and perseverance. Good luck.

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