How from the point of view of physiology to explain the fact that with a decrease in temperature, urination becomes more frequent?

How from the point of view of physiology to explain the fact that with a decrease in temperature, urination becomes more frequent?

Dr. Alan Hakim - \

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answers (3)

Answer 1
May, 2021

Urination also usually increases slightly when the temperature rises (at the first stage of fever), this is due to an increase in blood pressure, blood outflow to internal organs (vasospasm in the skin), including the kidneys.

In the second stage of fever (the stage of maintaining an elevated temperature), there is some delay in the release of fluid and sodium chloride from the tissues, which is associated with the activity of vasopressin (an antidiuretic neuropeptide that is also involved in endogenous antipyresis - a mechanism that allows us not to overheat above the critical maximum) and the secretion of aldosterone.

In the third phase of fever, the synthesis of antidiuretics decreases and this fluid accumulated in the tissues begins to be actively excreted by the kidneys.

Answer 2
May, 2021

There is a theory according to which our intelligent body arranges the urge to urinate in order to save energy.

Urine, roughly speaking, is a foreign fluid in the body. It has its own thermal conductivity and heat capacity, i.e. constantly absorbs heat from the body, which is needed a lot, because it is cold in the external environment.

Then the body decides to release urine, so as not to waste its resources on it, but to use them to heat other parts of the body.

Answer 3
May, 2021

Everyone knows the expression Assassinated - which means Scared. It can be assumed that the human body was afraid to freeze to death, and therefore urinating more often.

In fact, both when a stressful situation arises, and when hypothermia is threatened, similar processes occur in our body: blood flow to the skin is sharply reduced, vital organs begin to work more actively.

A stressful situation from a person's evolutionary past is, as a rule, physical damage. Since the main danger to human life in case of injury is blood loss, the body limits the transport of blood to the limbs of a person, and indeed to the skin. Restriction of blood flow is ensured by contraction of blood vessels.

With the threat of hypothermia, the same story occurs: since the largest human organ is his skin, then heat loss through the surface of this organ is maximum.

In both the first and second cases, the vital organs begin to work more actively. In the first case - to escape or to fight back the threat, in the second case - to compensate for the heat loss. To do this, the body speeds up metabolism, actively burning fuel, dilates blood vessels for more active blood circulation in these most vital organs. But the body cannot completely neutralize the increase in blood pressure caused by the narrowing of the blood vessels of the skin. Therefore, excess pressure is relieved by excreting excess fluid from the bloodstream by the kidneys in the form of urine.

This ancient mechanism still gives a person a chance of survival after serious injury or hypothermia.

It will be fair as well. note that accelerated metabolism also contributes to the increase in urine volume, but its share is less significant than the mechanism described above.

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