How does a defibrillator "revive" a person?

How does a defibrillator "revive" a person?

[L4D2] - Bots can defib dead players

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answers (3)

Answer 1
January, 2021

Defibrillators are my favorite example of how fictional fiction can influence objective reality.

First, I'll tell you about popular myths. The defibrillator does not "start" the heart rate, it stops it. There are several types of abnormal heart rhythms, one of which is the so-called. fibrillation (flickering, trembling) of the ventricles. With this rhythm, ventricular contractions occur without the necessary coordination and the heart does not perform its function. In order to return to the natural rhythm of contractions, the heart is completely stopped with a short (~ 0.01 s) electrical impulse and then started back. To restart the heart, cardiopulmonary resuscitation is used, it is useless to shock a non-contracting heart muscle.

For this reason, defibrillate the so-called. flatline, no pulse, no asystolic state needed. If in a movie or on TV you see how a patient's heart stopped, the ECG machine beeps monotonously and shows a straight line, you are shown just such a state. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), chest compressions in this situation can save a person. It is pointless to shock him. Unfortunately, in feature films, even very serious and realistic ones, doctors now and then defibrillate people without a pulse.

Of all the possible types of heart rhythm, only two can be defibrillated: VF (ventricular fibrillation) and VT (ventricular tachycardia) ... Modern electronic defibrillators recognize the rhythm of the heart and will simply not work if you are trying to apply them to a patient who is not indicated for such a procedure. Unlike films, in life it is too smart a device to be used as a weapon of murder or suicide.

And now about the actual effect of fiction on real life. Remember the sound with which the defibrillator turns on in the cinema? Such an "electric" tone, gradually rising and turning into a discharge. In fact, defibrillators do not emit it.

This is the sound of older capacitors charging up. Modern capacitors are much more reliable, they work silently and do not make such a sound. Unfortunately, such quiet operation led to human casualties. Cases are described when medical staff mistook serviceable defibrillators for defective ones. The user waited for the same sound, did not hear it, believed that the working device was broken and ran to look for a replacement.

Modern defibrillators are specially designed so that this sound can still be emitted through a separate special speaker. It was added to the design precisely in order to correspond to the unrealistic display of the operation of this device in films and TV series.

To finish off the theme of the cinematic myths: remember how doctors sometimes rub defibrillator plates in films against each other or just them with each other boyfriend touch before the discharge? They don't do that in life. There is no point in this operation, but there is a risk of breaking the defibrillator. And finally, the placement of the plates. Wherever they are applied to poor patients, but most often bothplaced on the chest. It's wrong, right like this.

Answer 2
January, 2021

In Hollywood (and behind them Russian) cinema shows clichés - the heart stopped completely, they beat with a defibrillator, the heart beats again. It's a cinematic cliché. In fact, this does not happen.

Answer 3
January, 2021

The defibrillator helps with the so-called "ventricular fibrillation", when the automatism of the heart "flies off" and the muscle fibers in the heart muscle "move out of step", that is, instead of one powerful contraction that pushes the blood in the artery, they twitch chaotically. p>

The powerful electrical impulse of the defibrillator restores the synchronous work of muscle fibers.

Modern defibrillators have built-in "brains" that recognize fibrillation and give a shock only when necessary, as well as automatically adjust the pulse parameters, which makes it possible to use a defibrillator for untrained or minimally trained people (for example, at US airports, where automatic defibrillators hang around every corner like fire extinguishers).

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